The Faith of Puddleglum

“‘All you’ve been saying is quite right, I shouldn’t wonder. I’m a chap who always liked to know the worst and then put the best face I can on it. So I won’t deny any of what you said. But there’s one thing more to be said, even so. Suppose we HAVE only dreamed , or made up, all those things-trees and grass and sun and moon and stars and Aslan himself. Suppose we have. Then all I can say is that, in that case, the made-up things seem a good deal more important than the real ones. Suppose this black pit of a kingdom of yours IS the only world. Well, it strikes me as a pretty poor one. And that’s a funny thing, when you come to think it. We’re just babies making up a game, if you’re right. But four babies playing a game can make a play-world which licks your real world hollow. That’s why I’m going to stand by the play-world. I’m on Aslan’s side even if there isn’t any Aslan to lead it. I’m going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn’t any Narnia. So, thanking you kindly for our supper, if these two gentlemen and the young lady are ready, we’re leaving your court at once and setting out in the dark to spend our lives looking for Overland. Not that our lives will be very long, I should think; but that’s a small loss if the world’s as dull a place as you say.'”

 

C.S. Lewis “The Silver Chair”

 

Advertisements

European Masculinity

“‘Where I come from,’ said Jill, who was disliking him more every minute, ‘they don’t think much of men who are bossed about by their wives.'”

 

C.S. Lewis “The Silver Chair”

 

The Reason Lewis Wrote Narnia

“‘You are too old, children,’ said Aslan, ‘and you must begin to come close to your own world now.’

‘It isn’t Narnia, you know,’ sobbed Lucy. ‘It’s YOU. We shan’t meet YOU there. And how can we live, never meeting you?’

‘But you shall meet me, dear one,’ said Aslan.

‘Are-are you there too, Sir?’ said Edmund.

‘I am,’ said Aslan. ‘But there I have another name. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there.'”

 

C.S. Lewis “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader”

 

The Adventures of Eustace

“He had turned into a dragon while he was asleep. Sleeping on a dragon’s hoard with greedy, dragonish thoughts in his heart, he had become a dragon himself.”

“He wanted to get back among humans and talk and laugh and share things. He realized that he was a monster cut off from the whole human race. An appalling loneliness came over him…”

“‘Then the lion said-but I don’t know if it spoke-‘You will have to let me undress you’-I was afraid of his claws, I can tell you, but I was pretty nearly desperate now. So I just lay flatĀ  down on my back and let him do it….The very first tear he made was so deep that I thought it had gone right into my heart. And when he began pulling the skin off, it hurt worse than anything I’ve ever felt. The only thing that made me able to bear it was just the pleasure of feeling the stuff peel off..'”

“It would be nice, and fairly nearly true, to say that ‘from that time forth Eustace was a different boy.’ To be strictly accurate, he began to be a different boy. He had relapses. There were still many days when he could be very tiresome. But most of those I shall not notice. The cure had begun.”

 

C.S. Lewis “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader”

 

On Slavery

“‘Tender as my years may be,’ said Caspian, ‘I believe I understand the slave trade from within quite as well as your Sufficiency. And I do not see that it brings into the islands meat or bread or books or instruments of music or horses or armor or anything else worth having. But whether it does or not, it must be stopped.'”

C.S. Lewis “The Voyage of the Dawn Treader”

 

An Atheist Argument

“‘But they also say that he came to life again,’ said the Badger sharply.

‘Yes, they SAY,’ answered Nikabrik, ‘but you’ll notice that we hear precious little about anything he did afterward. He just fades out of the story. How do you explain that, if he really came to life? Isn’t it much more likely that he didn’t, and that the stories say nothing more about him because there was nothing more to say?'”

 

C.S. Lewis “Prince Caspian”